ESXi boot fatal error 33 inconsistent data

09/06/2018

Another quick write-up. Recently, while installing patches and rebooting ESXi hosts, I encountered the following error message during the boot process of an ESXi host: “esxi boot fatal error 33 inconsistent data”, accompanied by the filename causing the inconsistency.

A quick search on the Internet returned various useful tips, ranging from re-installation of ESXi, re-running the installer or replacing the damaged file. However, not all workarounds are applicable in all situations.

Perhaps it is too obvious, but this solution is also to be considered, especially while updating hosts;
Revert the ESXi host to it’s previous version. Now the ESXi host can boot and the installation of the patches can be continued.

This VMware KB outlines how to revert an ESXi host to it’s previous state.

If during the update process of ESXi this error shows up: “The host returns esxupdate error code:15. The package manager transaction is not successful. Check the Update Manager log files and esxupdate log files for more details
Also the esxupdate.log shows “esxupdate: esxupdate: ERROR: InstallationError: (”, ‘There was an error checking file system on altbootbank, please see log for detail.’)”, it is time to have a look at this KB.

I hope this will help. Thank you for reading.


ESXi CLIativity – Part 1

30/05/2018

As I showed in a previous post, it is possible to do pretty awesome actions using the ESXi Shell.

By using VMware PowerCLI and some other tools, you can further extend these possibilities.
In this example we use a Windows workstation and the tool Plink.
Plink comes with the well known PuTTY utility and is a command-line connection tool similar to ssh and very useful for automated operations.

As an example, we use the unmap script from this post, the goal is to minimize manual actions. The first step is to deploy and start the unmap script on a more convenient way, without logon to the ESXi host.

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vCSA and trusted AD sources

01/04/2018

Just a quick write up for my own convenience. Large organizations tend to have a lot of everything, from buildings and employees to Domain Controllers.
In times were Domain Controllers undergo maintenance, like an upgrade or relocation, dependent services may be impacted.
The way identity sources are configured differs per product, fortunately less often hard-coded by specifying a single domain controller, usually more flexible by specifying the AD domain.

For a vCenter Server Appliance (vCSA), additional identity sources can be configured, one commonly used is the Active Directory (Integrated Windows Authentication).

20180401-01.jpg

BTW, As a prerequisite, the vCSA should be joined to the Windows domain.

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Running unmap on a large number of datastores

08/03/2018

With the VMFS-6 filesystem came the option to automatically unmap datastores. In short, the unmap command is used to reclaim unused storage blocks on a VMFS datastore when thin provisioning is used.

When Datastores are still on VMFS-5, reclaiming disk space is a manual process. VMware KB “Using the esxcli storage vmfs unmap command to reclaim VMFS deleted blocks on thin-provisioned LUNs (2057513)” details how to use the unmap command.

The action is performed on an ESXi hosts, the basic command looks like this:

# esxcli storage vmfs unmap -l <Volume label>

Where Volume label is the human readable name of a Datastore like: “VMFS01”.

Depending on the size of the datastore(s), running unmap will take quite some time. If you have few datastores, you run this command a couple of times and voila. If cluster(s) have dozens of datastores, the following workaround can help you.

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vCSA, root partition is (almost) full

18/02/2018

hwA short post on a topic that I recently experienced on vCenter Server Appliance, version 6.0.
After receiving an alert that the root “/” partition was quickly filling up, it is time to act quickly. When the root partition reaches 100% of it’s capacity, service disruption can occur.
First step is to check the capacity of the vCSA partitions. Log in to the vCSA through SSH, if you are running the appliance shell, enable and access the Bash shell:

Command> shell.set --enabled true
Command> shell

In the Bash shell run this command to check the capacity of the partitions:

# df -h

The second line of the output (starting with /dev/sda3) shows the status of the root partition. If the value under Use% reaches 100%, you are in trouble. Also notice that the root partition is only 11 GB.
Second step is to determine the root cause of the full partition. A good strategy is to look for large consumers. The next command searches for files larger then 100 MB, only on the root partition:

# find / -xdev -type f -size +100M

In my case some interesting results:

/usr/lib/vmware-sca/wrapper/bin/wrapper.log
/usr/lib/oracle/11.2/client64/lib/libociei.so
/var/log/dnsmasq.log-20180121
/var/log/dnsmasq.log-20180128
/var/log/dnsmasq.log-20180107
/var/log/dnsmasq.log-20180114
/var/log/dnsmasq.log
/etc/vmware-vpx/docRoot/client/Vmware-viclient.exe

The most eye-catching files are: the wrapper.log and the dnsmasq.log files.

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Getting started with the vCSA 6.x – Part 3

22/01/2018

In part 1 and part 2 of this series about the vCSA, we have covered topics like; the shells, filesystem, services, health, logging, database and some extra tools. Recently I realised there a few more topics worth mentioning.

Appliance MUI

In pre 6.0 releases of the vCSA, there was a vCenter Server Appliance Management Interface, better known as the VAMI. This management interface is written in HTML5 and is now called the e Appliance Management User Interface (Appliance MUI).

You will find the new management interface in vCSA 6.0 and 6.5, however there are some differences.

You can login to this interface, using: https://<vCSA fqdn or IP>:5480. Us a local account such as the “root” account.

Fig. 1 – Summary vCSA 6.0.

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Writing effective scripts using VMware PowerCLI

30/12/2017

20171224-00Lately I have been busy writing some Windows PowerShell scripts for a vSphere environment. I noticed that there are some similarities between learning a spoken language and a programming language. In both cases you start by learning the grammar and vocabulary and develop your skills by a lot of practicing. But for both skills, when you have not used them for a while, the skills will fade.
While writing and testing my scripts, I realized that a good preparation and a structured way of working will help you becoming more productive and making fewer mistakes.
This post is not a full blown Windows PowerShell course, but contains some insights I would like to share with you. If this is all new, I recommend following a PowerShell Getting Started training. Pluralsight offers over 11 Windows PowerShell courses from beginner to expert level. So if you are relatively new to Windows PowerShell and the VMware PowerCLI, please read on.

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