Build your own NetApp ONTAP 9 Lab for free


I do not write this kind of posts very often, but the subject touches one of the most important parts of virtualization: Storage.
When your choice of storage is NetApp or you want to know more about managing NetApp, please read on.

How to Build a NetApp ONTAP 9 Lab” is a free available guide, written by Neil Anderson at This almost 120 pages step-by-step guide walks you through the setup of a lab consisting of two NetApp ONTAP Clusters, including clients, routers, IP address tables etc. The best part, you can build the entire lab for free, all you need is a PC with preferable 16 GB of RAM (if you want to run ONTAP v8.2, 8 GB RAM will do).

The lab outlined in the book is the same one, Neil uses for hands-on demonstrations which you can also find on www.

The guide can be downloaded for free at:

VCP6-DTM exam – Section 5


The VMware Certified Professional 6 — Desktop and Mobility Exam blueprint Section 5 is all about VMware Mirage. An overview of the various components, installation, configuration and common scenario’s. All these subjects are covered in the second last episode of this Study Guide. The final Section 6 is in preparation.

In the attachment, you will find the complete sections 1 to 5.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download new VCP6-DTM exam – Section 5 (Complete)

VCP6-DTM exam – Section 4


The fourth episode of what is going to be the Study Guide for the VMware Certified Professional 6 — Desktop and Mobility Exam. The remaining objectives are in preparation.

In the attachment, you will find the complete sections 1, 2, 3 and 4.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download new VCP6-DTM exam – Section 4 (Complete)

Windows 10 dual-boot issues


Usually my writings are VMware related, so the title of this post seams to be off-topic. However VMware products played an important role in solving my dual-boot issues.
I am not going into great detail about the “Why do I want to install another OS on my computer?”. Well, I am not fully satisfied with Windows 10, but I have not reached the point to completely wipe Windows 10 off my Computer (an Asus N56VM with the original HDD replaced by a SSD) and do a fresh Linux install. For that reason, I decided to share my disk with the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS version and have both OS available.

In a nutshell, the first steps are:

  • Free up a block of continuous disk space to make room for the Ubuntu installation.
  • Download Ubuntu and create a bootable USB drive or DVD.
  • Install Ubuntu in the available disk space.

During the installation of Ubuntu, you are presented the option to install Ubuntu alongside your existing Windows installation. The installation went smoothly, but after rebooting my computer I found out that Windows 10 was the one and only available bootable OS.

The Internet presents an overwhelming amount of advice for solving dual-boot issues. It is important to know if your computer has a BIOS or a UEFI firmware, in my case UEFI it is.
A very common advice is to switch-off Secure Boot, but the Asus UEFI firmware does not have this option. Also, major Linux distributions do support Secure Boot, so this does not make sense imho. See this link for more information about UEFI.

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VCP6-DTM exam – Section 3


Appologies, it has been quite a long time since my previous post in this series. This had to do with work and personal circumstances. The good news is that I have continued working on this guide. The first result is this update which contains the first three Sections. The remaining objectives are in preparation. In the attachment, you will find the complete VCP6-DTM exam Section 1,2 and 3.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download new VCP6-DTM exam – Section 3 (Complete)

Check_MK and vSphere – vCenter Server


This post is the third part in a series about Check_MK and vSphere. In the second part, I showed you the options for monitoring an ESXi host without using vCenter Server. In this post we will explore the options for monitoring a vCenter Server on Windows and also the vCenter Server Appliance (VCSA).

vCenter Server Windows

For this POC we have a vCenter Server 6.0 U2 (build 3634793) on a Windows Server 2012 R2. As this is a normal Windows server, I installed the Check_MK agent for Windows and added the host to Check_MK. For the property Agent type, select “Check_MK Agent (Server)”.

2016-08-21_01Figure 1

By default the Check_MK Windows Agents presents – without further tweaking – a lot of information; CPU and Memory utilization, Disk I/O, status of the filesystems, status of the Network interfaces and many more.

Now it’s time to reveal the vSphere options. We follow the same procedure as we did for the ESXi host. In the WATO configuration go to Host & Service Parameters \ Datasource Programs and select Check state of VMware ESX via vSphere. Now create a second rule for the vCenter Server, start with providing a descriptive name.

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Check_MK and vSphere – ESXi


This post is the second part in a series about Check_MK monitor and vSphere. In the first part Check_MK was introduced and some basic Installation and Configuration was explained.

According to the documentation, for monitoring VMware ESXi and vCenter Server, Check_MK has implemented a plugin that uses the vSphere API for retrieving information. This plugin is much more efficient than versions based on the Perl API.

So let’s start and see what can be revealed. To get a clear understanding of the various options, I will perform a step-by-step configuration instead of ticking all options at once.

The first step is to go into WATO and add an ESXi host. Under WATO, choose, Hosts and New Host.

2016-08-10-01Figure 1

You must at least enter the Hostname and an IP address, the Alias is optional. Under Agent Type place a tick and select “No Agent”.

At this time, the result is not very exciting; the ESXi host will be pinged.

2016-08-10-02Figure 2

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