OpenStack lab – Part 2

28/12/2016

In the previous post, we described the installation of an OpenStack lab on a single (physical) host. In this post, we will continue.

First, we will perform some checks and see if our OpenStack environment works as expected. I will also show some useful commands for troubleshooting, how to start and stop your environment.

We will also have a look at the GUI components and finally we will create our first stack.

Does it work as expected?

To check the result of our work, from our “normal” user account logon tot the oslcontroller:

$ ssh – A root@oslcontroller

From there run the following command to check the status of OpenStack:

# openstack-status

You will get a very detailed overview as OpenStack admin

# source keystonerc_admin

# openstack-status

20161223_003

Fig. 1 – status of the OpenStack services

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OpenStack lab – Part 1

27/12/2016

Introduction

20161222-01OpenStack is a well known open source cloud platform, most often in the form of IaaS. The development of OpenStack is controlled by the OpenStack Foundation and is supported by dozens of well known companies.

Although VMware has its own proprietary cloud platform, the company is also an active contributor to the OpenStack community and also developed VMware Integrated OpenStack. VMware Integrated OpenStack lets you rapidly deploy an OpenStack environment based on VMware’s own ESXi hypervizor and NSX. Fine for a production environment but not suitable for a simple lab. Apart from VMware licenses, the biggest drawback, you will need an awful lot of hardware for such a lab.

For some time I was searching for a way to have an OpenStack lab environment with some real life features. Recently, the dutch version of Computer magazine C’T published an interesting article how to build an all-in-one OpenStack environment, some specifications:

  • The whole environment runs on a single host with Fedora 24.
  • The host runs 5 Open VZ containers. The containers run 1 controller node, 3 compute nodes and 1 network node.
  • The nodes are connected with each other and the outside world by means of Virtual Networks based on libvirt, see for more information this link.
  • On these nodes are installed and configured the following OpenStack services: Nova, Glance, Keystone, Horizon, Neutron, Swift, Cinder, Ceilometer and Heat.
  • OpenStack components are installed and configured with help of Packstack, which uses Puppet modules controlled by an answer file to deploy the OpenStack Components.

I started with installing an old HDD drive in a old ESXi host (HP ML 110 G5) with only 8 GB of RAM. After finishing the installation and configuration of the host computer, the complete environment is created by running just 4 scripts!

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VCP6-DTM exam – Complete

20/11/2016

The final Section 6 of the VMware Certified Professional 6 — Desktop and Mobility Exam is all about the VMware Workspace Portal (actual name VMware Identity Manager. With this addition, all objectives as mentioned in the Exam blueprint have been covered.

In the attachment, you will find the complete Study Guide.

As the VCP 7 – Desktop and Mobility is currently in Beta, it’s preparation guide shows that there will be some changes. Most of the topices remain, new are the User Environment Manager and App Volumes. So probably this Studyguide will be updated soon.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download VCP6-DTM exam – Complete


Build your own NetApp ONTAP 9 Lab for free

18/10/2016

I do not write this kind of posts very often, but the subject touches one of the most important parts of virtualization: Storage.
When your choice of storage is NetApp or you want to know more about managing NetApp, please read on.

How to Build a NetApp ONTAP 9 Lab” is a free available guide, written by Neil Anderson at Flackbox.com. This almost 120 pages step-by-step guide walks you through the setup of a lab consisting of two NetApp ONTAP Clusters, including clients, routers, IP address tables etc. The best part, you can build the entire lab for free, all you need is a PC with preferable 16 GB of RAM (if you want to run ONTAP v8.2, 8 GB RAM will do).
20161017_054

The lab outlined in the book is the same one, Neil uses for hands-on demonstrations which you can also find on www. flaxbox.com.

The guide can be downloaded for free at: http://www.flackbox.com/netapp-simulator/


VCP6-DTM exam – Section 5

17/10/2016

The VMware Certified Professional 6 — Desktop and Mobility Exam blueprint Section 5 is all about VMware Mirage. An overview of the various components, installation, configuration and common scenario’s. All these subjects are covered in the second last episode of this Study Guide. The final Section 6 is in preparation.

In the attachment, you will find the complete sections 1 to 5.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download new VCP6-DTM exam – Section 5 (Complete)


VCP6-DTM exam – Section 4

29/09/2016

The fourth episode of what is going to be the Study Guide for the VMware Certified Professional 6 — Desktop and Mobility Exam. The remaining objectives are in preparation.

In the attachment, you will find the complete sections 1, 2, 3 and 4.

I hope you like this guide, and welcome your comments.

Download new VCP6-DTM exam – Section 4 (Complete)


Windows 10 dual-boot issues

08/09/2016

Usually my writings are VMware related, so the title of this post seams to be off-topic. However VMware products played an important role in solving my dual-boot issues.
I am not going into great detail about the “Why do I want to install another OS on my computer?”. Well, I am not fully satisfied with Windows 10, but I have not reached the point to completely wipe Windows 10 off my Computer (an Asus N56VM with the original HDD replaced by a SSD) and do a fresh Linux install. For that reason, I decided to share my disk with the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS version and have both OS available.

In a nutshell, the first steps are:

  • Free up a block of continuous disk space to make room for the Ubuntu installation.
  • Download Ubuntu and create a bootable USB drive or DVD.
  • Install Ubuntu in the available disk space.

During the installation of Ubuntu, you are presented the option to install Ubuntu alongside your existing Windows installation. The installation went smoothly, but after rebooting my computer I found out that Windows 10 was the one and only available bootable OS.

The Internet presents an overwhelming amount of advice for solving dual-boot issues. It is important to know if your computer has a BIOS or a UEFI firmware, in my case UEFI it is.
A very common advice is to switch-off Secure Boot, but the Asus UEFI firmware does not have this option. Also, major Linux distributions do support Secure Boot, so this does not make sense imho. See this link for more information about UEFI.

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