vCSA how to disable IPv6?

18/04/2017

For me it was already a common practice to disable IPv6 on ESXi hosts, but until recently I did not realize that vCenter Server can also benefit from it. For vCenter Server on Windows, you reconfigure the Windows network configuration. But how do you disable IPv6 on the vCSA?

I recently found that a vCSA 6.0 has at least three options to reconfigure the network settings. But only one option enables you to disable IPv6.

Using a web browser you can log in to the vCSA Web console by entering URL: https: //<vCSA hostname or IP address>:5480

From there go to Networking, under Networking Interfaces, choose Edit to open the “Edit IP Configuration” window. Here you can configure IPv4 and IPv6 and disable IPv4, but no option to disable IPv6.

Fig.1

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OpenStack lab – Part 2

28/12/2016

In the previous post, we described the installation of an OpenStack lab on a single (physical) host. In this post, we will continue.

First, we will perform some checks and see if our OpenStack environment works as expected. I will also show some useful commands for troubleshooting, how to start and stop your environment.

We will also have a look at the GUI components and finally we will create our first stack.

Does it work as expected?

To check the result of our work, from our “normal” user account logon tot the oslcontroller:

$ ssh – A root@oslcontroller

From there run the following command to check the status of OpenStack:

# openstack-status

You will get a very detailed overview as OpenStack admin

# source keystonerc_admin

# openstack-status

20161223_003

Fig. 1 – status of the OpenStack services

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OpenStack lab – Part 1

27/12/2016

Introduction

20161222-01OpenStack is a well known open source cloud platform, most often in the form of IaaS. The development of OpenStack is controlled by the OpenStack Foundation and is supported by dozens of well known companies.

Although VMware has its own proprietary cloud platform, the company is also an active contributor to the OpenStack community and also developed VMware Integrated OpenStack. VMware Integrated OpenStack lets you rapidly deploy an OpenStack environment based on VMware’s own ESXi hypervizor and NSX. Fine for a production environment but not suitable for a simple lab. Apart from VMware licenses, the biggest drawback, you will need an awful lot of hardware for such a lab.

For some time I was searching for a way to have an OpenStack lab environment with some real life features. Recently, the dutch version of Computer magazine C’T published an interesting article how to build an all-in-one OpenStack environment, some specifications:

  • The whole environment runs on a single host with Fedora 24.
  • The host runs 5 Open VZ containers. The containers run 1 controller node, 3 compute nodes and 1 network node.
  • The nodes are connected with each other and the outside world by means of Virtual Networks based on libvirt, see for more information this link.
  • On these nodes are installed and configured the following OpenStack services: Nova, Glance, Keystone, Horizon, Neutron, Swift, Cinder, Ceilometer and Heat.
  • OpenStack components are installed and configured with help of Packstack, which uses Puppet modules controlled by an answer file to deploy the OpenStack Components.

I started with installing an old HDD drive in a old ESXi host (HP ML 110 G5) with only 8 GB of RAM. After finishing the installation and configuration of the host computer, the complete environment is created by running just 4 scripts!

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Windows 10 dual-boot issues

08/09/2016

Usually my writings are VMware related, so the title of this post seams to be off-topic. However VMware products played an important role in solving my dual-boot issues.
I am not going into great detail about the “Why do I want to install another OS on my computer?”. Well, I am not fully satisfied with Windows 10, but I have not reached the point to completely wipe Windows 10 off my Computer (an Asus N56VM with the original HDD replaced by a SSD) and do a fresh Linux install. For that reason, I decided to share my disk with the latest Ubuntu 16.04 LTS version and have both OS available.

In a nutshell, the first steps are:

  • Free up a block of continuous disk space to make room for the Ubuntu installation.
  • Download Ubuntu and create a bootable USB drive or DVD.
  • Install Ubuntu in the available disk space.

During the installation of Ubuntu, you are presented the option to install Ubuntu alongside your existing Windows installation. The installation went smoothly, but after rebooting my computer I found out that Windows 10 was the one and only available bootable OS.

The Internet presents an overwhelming amount of advice for solving dual-boot issues. It is important to know if your computer has a BIOS or a UEFI firmware, in my case UEFI it is.
A very common advice is to switch-off Secure Boot, but the Asus UEFI firmware does not have this option. Also, major Linux distributions do support Secure Boot, so this does not make sense imho. See this link for more information about UEFI.

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View Agent, what is installed?

16/07/2016

20160710-01

While (re)installing the VMware Horizon View Agent you can choose from many features. (De)Selecting a feature can have a big impact on the user experience (Once a customer was very upset when he found out that Client Drive Redirection was activated…).
After finishing the installation of the View Agent, there is no easy way to review the features installed (as far as I know). Luckily, the log files created during the installation provide a lot of information.

Location of the log files: C:\ProgramData\VMware\logs.
Search for the latest vmmsi.log, these come in the format: vmmsi.log_yyyymmdd_hhmmss.
Note, there are also log files starting with vminst.

Open the log file with your favorite editor.

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Install VMware Tools in CentOS 7

08/07/2016

20160708-01The VMware Tools are an essential part during the installation of a Virtual Machine. For many Operating Systems you can go the easy way and install the VMware Tools right from the vSphere Web Client. You will install the VMware Tools that comes bundled with vSphere ESXi.

BTW, Since September 2015, there is also a downloadable version of VMware Tools (versions 10.0, 10.0.5, 10.0.8 and 10.0.9). The Downloadable versions (should be seen as a Solution) support all version of ESXi from 5.0 and later, see VMware Product Interoperability Matrixes. See the release notes of the latest version.

So far so good, for Windows Operating Systems, the installation of the VMware Tools is a no brainer. For Linux operating systems, installation is more complicated, for most reasons because Linux Operation Systems do have multiple options to install software.

In my case, I usually work with CentOS (based on the sources of Red Hat Enterprise Linux RHEL). CentOS uses RPM as a packet manager. Packet Managers do have many advantages while maintaining a Linux server. Unfortunately, the bundled version of the VMware Tools doesn’t come in .rpm format, but as an archive file in tar.gz format. Although installation of a .tar.gz is straightforward, it is not the way to go.

An alternative is using VMware’s OSP repository, see this nice post in case you want to know more. You can browse the OSP repository here. For CentOS, browse the corresponding RHEL version. You will also notice that there is no entry for RHEL7. Trying the RHEL6 version failed in my case.

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Wots … Uh the Driver?

28/12/2015

A modern server is besides our favorite ESXi hypervisor loaded with all kinds of additional software, like BIOS, and firmware and drivers for items like; Baseboard management , Remote support interfaces, Storage controllers, NICs, Power Supplies, to name a few.
If trouble arises and you must contact your hardware vendor or VMware support, in many situations you are kindly requested to install the latest updates, firmware versions and drivers.

Some vendors provide ISO images or repositories containing the actual updates, you may run the update process and voilà, ready and done.
If you want to stay in control and want some more insight in this subject, please read on.

It comes down to these four questions:

  • What hardware is in the server?
  • How to determine the current firmware and or driver?
  • Which driver and or firmware do I need?
  • How do I upgrade drivers and firmware?

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