About Long Fat Networks and TCP tuning

08/09/2017

Recently I came about a data communications subject that was pretty unknown to me, known as the Bandwidth-delay product. Knowledge about this can help you to recognize certain network issues and ways to resolve them. It is all about two Linux hosts, a source and a destination host, communicating with each other over a high capacity network link. The question is how can you, given this scenario, reach maximum throughput over the network?

BDP

The first step is to determine the Bandwidth-delay product for this network. Bandwidth-delay product (BDP) is defined as the product of a data link’s capacity (in bits per second) and its round-trip delay time (in seconds). The result, the amount of data (in bits or bytes), is the maximum amount of data on the network at any given time, that is data that has been transmitted but not yet acknowledged.
Why is this important? The TCP protocol is designed for reliable transmission of data, acknowledgements are an essential part of the protocol. A high BDP value has impact on the efficiency of TCP, because the protocol can only achieve optimum throughput if a sender sends a sufficiently large quantity of data before being required to stop and wait until a confirming message (acknowledgement) is received from the receiver, acknowledging successful receipt of that data.

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CentOS Clone with Fixed IP fails

24/11/2013

After booting  a cloned CentOS 6.x (or equivalent Red Hat), you will notice that eth0 is missing and the only available adapter is the loopback interface.

Based on this excellent post (Thank you very much Alex!), a quick write-up for my own convenience, the complete overview for fixing this issue, changing the IP address and the hostname.

First step, note the new MAC Address for the network adapter. As a result of cloning a VM, MAC addresses will change.

CentOSClone-01Figure 1

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